Simon Sinek uses the military setting to highlight the importance of safety. How does this same idea transfer to the work world we inhabit, in which safety might

Simon Sinek uses the military setting to highlight the importance of safety. How does this same idea transfer to the work world we inhabit, in which safety might be related to effort and risk-taking and creativity? Or is the military environment entirely different and unique?

The Malden Mills case was considered a remarkable act of extending safety and security to others. The workers were protected, the factory was rebuilt and operated for another 20 years. But sadly the local plant was closed in 2015 and the work was transferred to two remaining locations owned by the company.

How is this idea of sacrifice for the safety (both for emotional safety and for basic needs) relevant (or not relevant) in the less dramatic, routine events of the average person’s daily life?

Share an example, from personal experience, about how a leader provided for safety and built trust and loyalty – or share a case in which a leader missed an opportunity to do so.

Does Sinek overstate the importance of safety? Is it really a leader’s responsibility? If so, why? Is there any research we can point to on this subject?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *